Health Screenings

As you reach certain age groups, it is important to remember which health screenings you should schedule in order to maintain your optimum health.

Beginning at birth, there is a schedule of immunizations and testing that should be used as a guide to direct you when you should have certain diagnostic testing done as part of your preventive healthcare.

Children 0-12

Immunizations:

  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Chickenpox, DPT, Polio, BCG
  • Hepatitis B1 - between birth and 2 months
  • Hepatitis B2 - between 1 and 4 months
  • Hepatitis B3 - between 6 months and 18 months
  • DPT - at 2, 4, 6 and 18 months; 5 years
  • Hib - at 2, 4, 6 and between 12 & 15 months
  • Polio - at 2, 4 & between 12 & 15 months; 5 years
  • MMR - between 12-15 months; 5 years; 12 years
  • Varicella - between 12 & 18 months; 12 years

Screenings:

  • Initial Dental Evaluation - 3 years
  • Anemia Blood Test - between 9 and 12 months
  • TB Skin Test - 12 months

Women 40-50

Immunizations:

  • Influenza vaccination annually if at high risk or diagnosed with heart or lung disease
  • Tetanus Booster every 10 years

Screenings:

  • Annual Physical Exam including blood pressure screening, pelvic exam, and digital rectal exam
  • Cardiovascular Risk Evaluation - total cholesterol and HDL every 5 years
  • Vision screening - Glaucoma screening every 5 years, more frequently if African American or have a family history of glaucoma; Vision test if experiencing eye strain or difficulty reading smaller print
  • Hearing test - Hearing test if experiencing difficulty in hearing certain words clearly
  • Cancer Risk Evaluation - Clinical Breast Exam annually; Mammogram annually (base line exam at age 35); PAP smear (testing every other year is acceptable in women who have had at least 3 normal annual PAP smears and no history of an abnormal smear).  Skin: The American Cancer Society recommends a cancer-related checkup, including skin examination, every three years for people between 20 and 40 years of age and every year for people age 40 and older.  Colon: The American Cancer Society recommends the following guidelines for screening in individuals over age 50 - yearly fecal occult blood test plus flexible Sigmoidoscopy every 5 years*, or Colonoscopy every ten years*, or double contrast barium enema every 5 - 10 years*. NOTE - You should begin colorectal cancer screening earlier and/or undergo screening more often if they have any of the following colorectal cancer risk factors:
    • Strong family history of colorectal cancer or polyps (cancer or polyps in a first degree relative younger than 60 or in two first degree relatives of any age.)
    • Families with hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes (familian adenomatours polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer
    • A personal history of colorectal cancer or adenomatous polyps OR
    • A personal history of chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

* A digital rectal examination (DRE) should be performed at the time of each screening Sigmoidoscopy, Colonoscopy or Barium Enema examination.

Men 40-50

Immunizations:

  • Influenza vaccination annually if at high risk or diagnosed with heart or lung disease
  • Tetanus Booster every 10 years

Screenings:

  • Annual Physical Exam including blood pressure screening
  • Cardiovascular Risk Evaluation - total cholesterol and HDL every 5 years
  • Vision screening - Glaucoma screening every 5 years, more frequently if African American or have a family history of glaucoma; Vision test if experiencing eye strain or difficulty reading smaller print
  • Hearing test - Hearing test if experiencing difficulty in hearing certain words clearly
  • Cancer Risk Evaluation - Prostate: The American Cancer Society recommends that beginning at age 50, you talk with your physician about beginning annual prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood testing and digital rectal exams (DRE) of the prostate gland. Men who are in high-risk groups, such as African Americans or men, who have a history of prostate cancer in close family members, should talk with their health care providers about beginning screenings at a younger age. Skin: The American Cancer Society recommends a cancer-related checkup, including skin examination, every three years for people between 20 and 40 years of age and every year for people age 40 and older. Colon: The American Cancer Society recommends the following guidelines for screening in individuals over age 50 - yearly fecal occult blood test plus flexible Sigmoidoscopy every 5 years*, or Colonoscopy every ten years*, or double contrast barium enema every 5 - 10 years*. NOTE - You should begin colorectal cancer screening earlier and/or undergo screening more often if they have any of the following colorectal cancer risk factors:
    • Strong family history of colorectal cancer or polyps (cancer or polyps in a first degree relative younger than 60 or in two first degree relatives of any age.)
    • Families with hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes (familian adenomatours polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer
    • A personal history of colorectal cancer or adenomatous polyps OR
    • A personal history of chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

* A digital rectal examination (DRE) should be performed at the time of each screening Sigmoidoscopy, Colonoscopy or Barium Enema examination.

(The above reflects standard health screening guidelines only. Please discuss your risk factors for certain diagnoses with your personal physician.)

 

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© 2014  GBMC. This website is for informational purposes only and not intended as medical advice or a substitute for a consultation with a professional healthcare provider.