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Neonate
Neonate


Erythema toxicum

Definition:

Erythema toxicum is a common, noncancerous skin condition seen in newborns.



Alternative Names:

Erythema toxicum neonatorum



Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

Erythema toxicum may appear in 50 percent or more of all normal newborn infants. It usually appears in term infants between the ages of 3 days and 2 weeks.

Its cause is unknown.

The condition may be present in the first few hours of life, generally appears after the first day, and may last for several days. Although the condition is harmless, it can be of great concern to the new parent.



Symptoms:

The main symptom is a rash of small, yellow-to-white colored papules surrounded by red skin. There may be a few or several papules. They usually appear on the face and middle of the body, but may also be seen on the upper arms and thighs.

The rash can change rapidly, appearing and disappearing in different areas over hours to days.



Signs and tests:

Examination by your health care provider during a routine well-baby exam is usually sufficient to make the diagnosis. No testing is usually needed.



Treatment:

The large red splotches typically disappear without any treatment or changes in skin care.



Support Groups:



Expectations (prognosis):

The rash usually clears within 2 weeks. It is usually completely gone by age 4 months.

See also: Milia



Complications:

There are no complications.



Calling your health care provider:

Discuss the condition with your health care provider during a routine examination if you are concerned.



Prevention:




Review Date: 8/24/2009
Reviewed By: Rachel A Lewis, MD, FAAP, Columbia University Pediatric Faculty Practice, New York, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.

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