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September 2018 - Media Tip Sheet

September 2018 - Media Tip Sheet

Listed below are story ideas from Greater Baltimore Medical Center (GBMC) which highlights health observances for the month of September. To pursue any of these stories, please call John M. Lazarou at 443-849-2126 or jlazarou@gbmc.org

  • SCHOOL BACKPACK AWARENESS
  • WOMEN…TAKE CHARGE OF YOUR HEALTH!
  • WHAT WOMEN SHOULD KNOW ABOUT GYNECOLOGICAL CANCERS
  • NEVER TOO LATE TO CHECK THAT PROSTATE
  • THE MOST RAPIDLY INCREASING CANCER IN THE U.S.
  • MAKE SURE YOU KNOW YOUR NUMBERS WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR CHOLESTEROL

SCHOOL BACKPACK AWARENESS

Children, for many reasons, might be feeling the “weight of the world” on their shoulders with the start of the new school year, but parents can make sure that their kids’ backpacks are as light as possible. The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) advises parents that their kids shouldn't carry a backpack that is more than 10 percent of their body weight and that if not worn properly, backpacks could lead to posture problems along with injured joints and muscles as well as severe neck, shoulder and back pain. A member of GBMC’s Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Team or a GBMC pediatrician can offer ways for parents to make sure that their kids wear their backpacks correctly and reduce the risk of injury, what kind of backpacks to consider for their child, how to help their kids cut down on the items in their packs, proper ways to insert items into backpacks and what to do if their child feels pain resulting from the extra weight of his or her pack. School Back Pack Awareness Day is on Wednesday, Sept. 19, and is a national observance geared to increasing awareness on the proper weigh for a child’s backpack and to educate parents how to pick the proper backpack to prevent pain and injury.

WOMEN…TAKE CHARGE OF YOUR HEALTH!

With Women’s Health & Fitness Day, the nation’s largest annual health promotion event for women of all ages, taking place on Wednesday, Sept. 26, GBMC physicians want to remind women to make their health a priority and what steps they can take to improve their health. Studies have shown that women have taken on many additional roles and responsibilities, both in the workplace and at home over the years but also face a plethora of health concerns as they age, mostly having to do with hormonal issues (menopause and perimenopause), which can increase a woman’s risk of heart disease, cancer and osteoporosis, along with other conditions ranging from fatigue, hot flashes and low libido. A GBMC primary care physician can discuss what important information they need to make smart health choices along with why and how to make time for regular physical activity.

WHAT WOMEN SHOULD KNOW ABOUT GYNECOLOGICAL CANCERS

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines gynecological cancers as any cancer that affects a woman’s reproductive organs. This includes ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, cervical cancer, vaginal cancer and vulvar cancer. September is Gynecological Cancer Awareness Month, and according to the CDC, each year approximately 71,500 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer and that all women are at risk for gynecologic cancers, and risk increases with age. Early detection is always a key element to increasing a cancer patient’s chances of survival, and it is also important to know the signs and symptoms of “below the belt” cancers. A physician, with GBMC’s GYN Oncology team, can discuss the common symptoms of gynecologic cancers women should be aware of, ways to reduce risk or detect it early and why it is vital to seek treatment as early as possible.

NEVER TOO LATE TO CHECK THAT PROSTATE

According to the American Cancer Society’s most recent estimates, over 33,000 American men will die from the most common type of cancer in men; prostate cancer. This disease is mostly a slow progressive cancer that starts with tiny changes in the shape and size of the prostate gland cells. The prostate, a gland only found in men, is in the front of the rectum and underneath the urinary bladder and whose main function is to secrete prostate fluid, one of the components of semen. Ronald Tutrone, MD, FACS, chief of the Division of Urology at GBMC, can outline various signs and symptoms, stages, causes, prevention, updates on various screening methods and treatment options for prostate cancer. September is both Prostate Cancer & Prostate Health Awareness Month.

THE MOST RAPIDLY INCREASING CANCER IN THE U.S.

According to published research in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), thyroid cancer diagnoses have tripled over the last 30 years. The prime reason for this, according to the report, can be mostly attributed to new technology being able to identify smaller growths leading to possible over diagnosis of the disease. On the other hand, doctors do caution though that this might not always be the case. The thyroid gland plays an integral role in regulating blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate and producing hormones that help the body regulate its metabolism. September is Thyroid Cancer Awareness Month and according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), approximately 640,000 people are living with thyroid cancer in the U.S. A physician at GBMC's Sandra & Malcolm Berman Cancer Institute can offer thyroid cancer causes, symptoms, risk factors, treatment options and prevention measures. They can also outline how can it be identified, some of the rare and more aggressive forms of thyroid cancer and address the following questions: Is a lump in your neck, always a sign of thyroid cancer? What are some of the less-common types of thyroid cancers? Is there more than one type of thyroid cancer?

MAKE SURE YOU KNOW YOUR NUMBERS WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR CHOLESTEROL

September is National Cholesterol Education Month, and now is a good time to get your blood cholesterol checked, learn proper steps to lower it if it is high, learn about lipid profiles and get proper food and lifestyle choices that can help lower their risk for disease. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like material that’s in all cells of the body. Your body needs some of it to make hormones and vitamins. Too much cholesterol can build up in your arteries. After a while, these deposits narrow your arteries, putting you at risk for heart disease and stroke. According to the American Heart Association, over 35 million people in the U.S, have levels of 240 mg/dL or higher. High cholesterol levels have been linked to heart disease, peripheral artery disease, atherosclerosis and other heart-related issues, causing patients with high cholesterol to also be at a higher risk for stroke and heart attack. A GBMC primary care physician can educate the public on ow to better manage their blood pressure and cholesterol, ensuring a healthy heart, can discuss the importance of clinical lifestyle evaluations, which includes tests for total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose and blood pressure and offers information on certain lifestyle changes that can help people improve their cholesterol levels which is beneficial for your heart and overall health.
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